Pharmasave
bayfield breeze issue

The Bayfield BreezeIssue 736 Week 34 Vol 15

August 16, 2023

2327 views

Issue 736 Week 34 Vol 15
Print Friendly, PDF & Email

COME TO THE FAIR AND JOIN IN THE FUN

"A Tractor Life for Me in 2023" is the theme of the Bayfield Community Fair to be held this weekend, Aug. 18-20 and excitement is building for the parade that will make its way a long Main Street, after a three year absence, on Saturday at 11 a.m. (Photo by Melody Falconer-Pounder)

“A Tractor Life for Me in 2023” is the theme of the Bayfield Community Fair to be held this weekend, Aug. 18-20 and excitement is building for the parade that will make its way a long Main Street, after a three year absence, on Saturday at 11 a.m. (Photo by Melody Falconer-Pounder)

It’s hard to believe, but after months of planning by dedicated organizers, the Bayfield Community Fair is set to open this Friday, Aug. 18. The fairground gates will open on Friday at 4:30 p.m. and close on Sunday, Aug. 20 at 3:45 p.m., giving the community two and a half days of a traditional agricultural fair complete with homecraft exhibits, demonstrations, competitions, events, activities, and music to enjoy.

Read on for a snapshot of what fairgoers can expect to see, taste, and experience at the Fair.

The Bayfield Agricultural Society (BAS) is hosting a Fish Fry Dinner on Friday at the Bayfield Agricultural Park with continuous serving from 4:30-7 p.m. Each dinner will include two pieces of Alaska Pollock, fries, coleslaw, roll, and a dessert. For details, please visit Fish Fry Dinner.   Advance tickets can be purchased by emailing info@bayfieldfair.ca There will be a limited number of tickets available at the gate, so people are encouraged to pre-purchase to avoid disappointment.

A spectacular fireworks display will be held on Friday night at 9 p.m. in the fairgrounds.

A full parade will take place on Saturday morning at 11 a.m. on Bayfield Main Street, starting at Catherine Street, proceeding past Clan Gregor Square and along John Ave to the fairgrounds. Confirmed parade participants include local businesses, marching bands, Shriners units, dignitaries, fire trucks, vintage vehicles and more. Attendees are asked not to forget to bring non-perishable food donations for the Bayfield Area Food Bank. Volunteers will be collecting along the parade route. Also Bayfield Community  Fair volunteers will be collecting cash donations along the route to cover parade costs. For additional information, please visit  2023 Parade.

It wouldn’t be a fair without games and activities for children. Age-appropriate games and activities galore will be offered for three different age groups: Preschool, School Age, and Young Adult. Grand River Inflatables will provide endless bouncy fun for the kids on Saturday. And the ever-popular train rides will be available throughout the weekend for the little ones.

Exhibits, displays, and presentations are an important part of a country fair. People won’t want to miss the Homecraft Show in the arena, which provides a showcase for the incredibly talented exhibitors in this community – baking and canning, flowers and plants, fruits and vegetables, art and photography as well as handcrafted quilting, sewing, knitting, crocheting, and woodworking. It’s always a feast for the eyes! The Penhale Landau will also be making a special appearance in the arena. And don’t forget the Poultry Show, which will be running all day on Saturday in the Lions’ display building behind the arena. Several special presentations will be offered in the arena over the weekend: “Flower Arranging” with Rose Odell and “Fermentation of Garden Produce” with Jorrie Flack and Sandy MacDonald, both on Saturday afternoon; and “Planting a Pollinator Garden in Your Yard” with Rhea Hamilton-Seeger on Sunday afternoon. A Robotics Demonstration is scheduled for several times on both Saturday and Sunday. Greenacre Dog Agility and Training will be making a return visit to the Fair with two demonstrations on Sunday afternoon. Please check the 2023 Schedule for the times and locations of all exhibits, displays, presentations and demonstrations.

Celebrating its 100th birthday, this beautifully maintained 1923 Ford Model "T", five-passenger, touring coupe will be participating in this year's Bayfield Community Fair parade to be held on the morning of Saturday, Aug. 19. (Photo by James Armstrong)

Celebrating its 100th birthday, this beautifully maintained 1923 Ford Model “T”, five-passenger, touring coupe will be participating in this year’s Bayfield Community Fair parade to be held on the morning of Saturday, Aug. 19. (Photo by James Armstrong)

Want to know what food will be available at the Fair? The Bayfield Community Fair welcomes newcomer “Truckin Mamas on the Run”, a food truck with an extensive menu. “Naomi’s Lemonade Stand and Ice Cream” will also be there to help everyone beat the heat. Also available will be cotton candy, snow cones, bag candy, hot dogs, pop, and water. There will be lots of choices to satisfy every craving!

Fair organizers have planned a full lineup of quality entertainment for this weekend. At Friday’s opening, Adam Lang will provide the evening’s entertainment with his easy-listening guitar playing and vocals. On Saturday afternoon, Erick Traplin, a very popular children’s entertainer, will be doing two high-energy, interactive shows. The Rock Revival Concert at the fairgrounds on Saturday night will feature tribute bands “Zed” and “Southern Fried”. These two bands will be performing hits from Led Zeppelin, Lynyrd Skynyrd, ZZ Top, and more, giving everyone a chance to rock out the park after dark! For tickets to this concert, please visit: Bayfield Town Hall Events. Last, but certainly not least, the Bayfield Ukulele Society will be performing for everyone on Sunday afternoon. For exact times of all performances at the Fair, please check the 2023 Schedule linked above.

This is just a brief overview of what will be happening at the Bayfield Fair. For additional information about the Fair, please visit  Bayfield Community Fair .  The BAS extends a warm welcome to everyone in the community, as well as visitors, to: “Come to the Fair and Join in the Fun”.

TWO SUMMER EVENTS WAVED BLUE FLAG

The Municipality of Bluewater and Village of Bayfield Marina hosted a Marina Litter Clean up over the course of the morning on Saturday, July 22.

Organizers would like to offer a big thank you to those that joined. With the help of those in attendance they collected five bags of litter that included over 300 cigarette butts.

These stats were reported to: Ocean Wise to add to their national litter database to help with programing and policy.

Additionally, 30 pollution prevention kits were handed out to boaters; these included an oil absorbent sock, absorbent rags and pads, educational brochures, and a marine store canvas reusable bag.

Then in the afternoon on Thursday, July 27 the Municipality of Bluewater joined with the Bayfield Branch of the Huron County Library to present “Playful Plastics”. This program highlighted how to reuse household plastics to create fun crafts!

Playful Plastics was a huge success with a total of 39 participants from the Municipality of Bluewater Day Camp as well as the general public. Fifty-seven activity kits were distributed. These included a sun-catcher, a wind-spinner and DIY stamps.

Anyone who is interested in learning more about the Blue Flag is invited to go to the Blue Flag Program page on the Municipality of Bluewater website.


MUSICAL DOUBLE-HEADER COMING TO AGRICULTURE PARK THIS SATURDAY

ZED is one of two bands that will perform in Agriculture Park on Aug. 19. Tickets are available now! (Submitted photo)

ZED is one of two bands that will perform in Agriculture Park on Aug. 19. Tickets are available now! (Submitted photo)

This coming Saturday, Aug. 19, the Bayfield Town Hall Heritage Society and the Bayfield Agricultural Society are joining forces to bring a “Rock Revival” to the Bayfield Community Fair! Two bands – “ZED” and “Southern Fried” – will take over the Bayfield Fairgrounds at Agricultural Park.

ZED will bring Led Zeppelin’s rock to life as this band faithfully recreates the sound of Led Zeppelin’s studio albums to an astonishing level of accuracy while also capturing the magical aura of the Led Zeppelin live experience.

Established in 2003, Southern Fried has been stunning audiences with a true experience of Southern rock music. They have been hailed as simply the most authentic-sounding Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute anywhere! In addition to Lynyrd Skinner tunes, Southern Fried plays southern classics by such groups as the Allman Brothers, ZZ Top and more.

Tickets are $30. Fairground gates for this Rock Revival will open at 6:30 p.m. while the concert will start at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are available now for $30. There will be a cash bar. Attendees are asked to bring their own chair.

Tickets for this double-header can be purchased: here.

“Danceland” is coming to the Bayfield Town Hall for their end of summer 2023 celebration!

This afternoon outdoor concert will begin at 4 p.m. with the grounds opening at 3:30 p.m.

The jam band is composed of Jale and Joe Ferland as well as drummer Brad Park along with guest keyboard players and bassists.The Ferlands may already be known to many locals as their Grateful Dead/Jerry Garcia Band cover band, “Cherry Garcia Band” has played Bayfield Volkfest and at the River Road Brewery in the past.

Danceland is rooted in a timeless psychedelic Americana tradition, replete with fine, storyteller songcraft; sunny harmonies; lonesome pedal steel; stratospheric lead guitar passages; and a touch of Eastern mysticism. This band evolved during the pandemic when Joe began writing original tunes with additional lyric contributions provided by Jale.

The name Danceland comes from Danceland Road located just south of Bayfield in the Municipality of Bluewater – those who attend the concert will be treated to such locally inspired songs as, “Daneland Road” and “Bluewater Sky”. They will also delight in performances of music by the Grateful Dead and Bob Dylan, selections from the Motown era as well as a mix of Reggae. It sounds like there may be no more appropriate way to say, “Goodbye to summer!”

Tickets for Danceland at the Bayfield Town Hall are $20 each at Tickets.  Cash bar. Please bring a lawn chair.

LIVE AND SILENT AUCTIONS AN EXCITING PART OF “OFF THE WALL” FUNDRAISER

Bayfield Centre for the Arts LogoThe Bayfield Centre for the Arts (BCA) second  “Off the Wall” fundraising event is less than two weeks away. It is set for Saturday, Aug. 26 at the Bayfield Town Hall.

“We invite you to light up your Saturday and be a part of this delightful summer art event!” said Leslee Squirrell, president of the BCA.

More than 45 artists answered the call to explore the theme, “Year of Land or Lakes” and the results will be open to the public for a free exhibition from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and then in the evening from 4-7:30 p.m. those with tickets will have the opportunity to take home a piece of art right off the wall!

Ticket purchasers will be treated to delightful hor d’oeuvres and adult beverages (beer/wine) as well as an opportunity to bid on both live and silent auction items while waiting for their opportunity to choose a painting…off the wall.

And these auction items are sure to be quite a treat for the successful bidders.

One package includes:  two tickets to a Toronto Maple Leafs game during the 2023-24 season (centre ice – green), dinner for two at the famous Bardi’s Steak House on York Street in Toronto, and a signed Hockey Stick and photo from former Maple Leaf , Ryan O”Reilly. This auction item is valued over $1,000 and along with the signed items to a hockey fan it will be truly invaluable.

An oil painting entitled, “Colourful Huron County Fields” by Carol Finkbeiner Thomas, winner of Paint Ontario 2019, is an auction item that guests will surely be excited to bid on. Measuring 48” x 36” the painting is valued at $2,300.

An oil painting entitled, “Colourful Huron County Fields” by Carol Finkbeiner Thomas, winner of Paint Ontario 2019, is an auction item that guests will surely be excited to bid on. Measuring 48” x 36” the painting is valued at $2,300.

An oil painting entitled, “Colourful Huron County Fields” by Carol Finkbeiner Thomas, winner of Paint Ontario 2019, is another auction item that guests will surely be excited to bid on. Measuring 48” x 36” the painting is valued at $2,300.

Other bidding opportunities will include a Chef’s Table private dinner for six at the Little Inn of Bayfield; a Hauser outdoor lantern and side table; a Kids Craft Party for six from Crichet Handmade Designs, on Catherine Street in the village; as well as gift baskets from Bayfield merchants.

There are three ticket types available for purchase: Golden Ticket, Art Lovers Ticket and Social Butterfly Ticket.

The one and only Golden Ticket is $500 and gives two guests “front of the line” access to choose their painting first from all the works available.

The cost of the Art Lovers Ticket has been set at $175 for two guests and includes one painting. They will have the opportunity to pick a single painting from the wall when their ticket is drawn at random.

Social Butterfly Tickets are available for $45 each. These tickets are for those guests who want to experience all the evening has to offer, including the food, beverages and bidding on the auction items but without the art to take home.

To purchase tickets for the BCA Off the Wall fundraising event please visit: Year of Land or Lakes Tickets.

The premier sponsor for this event is Diane Snell of Royal LePage Heartland Realty.

BAYFIELD’S FORGOTTEN FELINES CREATES DEDICATED FACEBOOK PAGE FOR ADOPTIONS

Molly and her Moppets. (Submitted photo)

Molly and her Moppets. (Submitted photo)

Every week the volunteers at Bayfield’s Forgotten Felines encounter seemingly unimaginable challenges in protecting the cats and kittens that come into their care, one such feline family is the focus of Adopt a BFF this week.

Molly, who is practically a kitten herself, and her three little moppets were found when someone was digging a trench. Molly was scared off but her kittens were taken in and fed. People worked for three days to find Molly and her barely three week old babies were bottle-fed until that time. Once Molly was trapped she was reunited with the kittens and then they were all brought into the Rescue. One of the kittens was incredibly underweight and undersized and it turned out that two of the kittens had Bot Flies that had to be removed. These kittens are now healing, and volunteers are hopeful that they continue to do so and begin to thrive.

Anyone interested in adopting Molly or her moppets are asked to reach out to BFF through Facebook or email bayfieldsforgottenfelines@gmail.com.

BFF now has a new Facebook group dedicated to adoptions known as “Bayfield’s Forgotten Felines ADOPTION Group”.

“We are working on having all of our adoptable cats and kittens in one place. You can browse easily to find your fur baby,” said Deb Penhale, representing the Rescue. “We will still have our original Facebook page with lots of helpful information, interesting articles and some just plain adorable cat stuff.”

In addition to accepting monetary donations, BFF now has an Amazon wish list. This list contains items they need for the day-to-day care of their cats and kittens as well as some truly “wish” items. Items are marked as to their priority, number needed, and many explain what their use will be. There is a wide variety of prices and BFF appreciates whatever you can supply. Items need not be purchased through Amazon, the list is merely a guideline.

To view the items on the list please visit:  BFF Wish List.

Financial donations may also be sent via E-transfer to the email listed above or mailed to P.O. Box 33, Bayfield, ON, N0M 1G0. The adoption fee is $250. Adopted cats are vetted, shots are up-to-date and they are also spayed or neutered. Adoption inquiries may also be made to the BFF’s email address above.


ART SHOW AND SALE

After the parade on Saturday, Aug. 19, people are invited to the Bayfield Artist Guild’s 6th Annual Art Show and Sale. Members will be set up on the lawn of 52 Colina Street which is located opposite Pioneer Park. Paintings, drawings, photography and greeting cards will be available for purchase from noon to 3 p.m. Please note that the method of payment is the decision of each artist. (Submitted photo)

img_7963_53117605302_o

After the parade on Saturday, Aug. 19, people are invited to the Bayfield Artist Guild’s 6th Annual Art Show and Sale. Members will be set up on the lawn of 52 Colina Street which is located opposite Pioneer Park. Paintings, drawings, photography and greeting cards will be available for purchase from noon to 3 p.m. Please note that the method of payment is the decision of each artist. (Submitted photo)

COMMUNITY MEETING

Two concerned citizens of Bluewater, Joanne McCann and Anette Christensen Kalm, are hosting a community meeting regarding the proposed Bedrock Energy Compressed Air Storage Facility on the property at Mill Road and Goshen Line tonight (Wednesday), Aug. 16.

The meeting will be held in the Stanley Community Centre Park Pavillion starting at 6:30 p.m.

The meeting will provide a platform for people to come together and discuss the potential consequences and alternatives regarding the proposed facility.

Unsure as to what the project is all about and what it could mean for Bluewater? Please visit Bayfield Breeze Issue 734 Week 32 as links to more information can be found at the bottom of the issue in the Editor’s “Submissions” section.

The Stanley Community Centre Park Pavilion is located at 38594 Mill Road in Varna.

ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION OPEN HOUSE

The Municipality of Bluewater is initiating an Active Transportation Master Plan (ATMP) and is hosting an Open House on Tuesday, Aug. 22, to allow the public an opportunity to provide input into the future of active transportation in Bluewater.

Those who attend are asked to visit the Stanley Community Centre in Varna anytime between 4–8 p.m.

Active transportation uses non-motorized forms of travel to get from one destination to another.  It includes walking, cycling, running, skateboarding, rollerblading, among other “human-powered” means of travel.

Specifically, the ATMP will identify:

  • Which existing active transportation facilities need to be maintained or improved,
  • What new active transportation facilities are needed,
  • Which key destinations should be connected by active transportation,
  • How active transportation facilities (i.e., bike lanes, separated trails, etc.) should be designed,
  • How all ages and abilities can be accommodated,
  • How projects should be prioritized, and
  • How much funding is required.

The plan will guide how, and where, the municipality’s active transportation network, including sidewalks, trails and cycling facilities, are improved and expanded.

The Stanley Community Centre is located at 38572 Mill Road in Varna.

Residents are also invited to share their ideas online by filling out a survey. It can be obtained by visiting: Survey Form.

Additional information and opportunities to provide comments are available on Huron County Connects at www.connectedcountyofhuron.ca.

Questions and comments may be directed to Public Works Technician for the Municipality of Bluewater, Alex Basciano by calling 519 236-4351, Ext. 246 or by emailing pwtech@municipalityofbluewater.ca or Project Manager for R. J. Burnside and Associates Limited, Tricia Radburn by calling 226-486-1778 or by emailing tricia.radburn@rjburnside.com

Project and notice information will be made accessible upon request in accordance with the Accessibility Standard for Information and Communication under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005. Information will be collected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record.

FALL FOTO FEST

Registration for Bayfield Fall Foto Fest (FFF) launched on Aug. 1st!

The 10th annual FFF, presented by the Photography Club of Bayfield, takes place this year on Friday evening, Sept. 29 and all-day Saturday, Sept. 30.  The theme this year is “Travel: Near and Far”. All the presenters are eager to provide people with great learning opportunities to expand their photographic horizons regardless of their current skill level.

It all starts with an opening Keynote on Friday followed by a series of workshops throughout Saturday and into the evening. The workshops are each limited to 15 registrants to ensure the maximum interaction and learning. Given the limited number of registration spots available, interested individuals are therefore encouraged to register early so that they can guarantee getting the workshop of their choice.

Follow the link to: Fall Foto Fest  to learn more details about presenters and instructions on how to register. See you in September.

BRVTA

The Bayfield River Valley Trail Association (BRVTA) would like to offer a thank you to all who participated in the “Love Your Greats” beach and riverbank clean up this past Saturday, Aug. 12.

The membership is now looking forward to a couple upcoming hikes including an evening walk and one featuring a climate change educator.

On Saturday, Aug. 26, participants can enjoy a late-summer evening hike starting at 7 p.m. on the Woodland Trail.  This will be a 3.5 km walk through the woods as the day ends, returning to the parking lot by sunset at 8:20 p.m. Those who take part are asked to meet at the David Street trailhead: from the Mill Road/Hwy. 21 intersection, take Sarnia Street to Mactavish Crescent, then right onto David Street. Please follow the signs to trail parking.

Naftel’s Creek Conservation Area will be the location for a guided hike on Saturday, Sept. 9 at 10 a.m. The BRVTA members are pleased to have Michele Martin be their guide for this hike. Martin is a Climate Training Program Specialist at the University of Waterloo’s Climate Institute and has over thirty years’ experience in sustainability and climate change education and capacity building in Canada and internationally. Martin also holds a PhD in Environmental Studies from York University.

Naftel’s Creek Conservation Area is located at 79154 Bluewater Hwy, just north of Kitchigami Road.

The hikes are free and open to the public without pre-registration. The schedule is subject to change, so always check for updates in the Bayfield Breeze, the BRVTA Facebook page or the Municipality of Bluewater events calendar. Or people can contact the hike coordinator, Ralph Blasting, by calling 519 525-3205 or emailing rjblasting@gmail.com.

FOOD BANK

Attendees at the Bayfield Community Fair parade are encouraged to bring along non-perishable food items to fill this truck that will be making its way along the parade route on Saturday, Aug. 19. (Photo by Catherine Tillmann)

Attendees at the Bayfield Community Fair parade are encouraged to bring along non-perishable food items to fill this truck that will be making its way along the parade route on Saturday, Aug. 19. (Photo by Catherine Tillmann)

Bayfield Area Food Bank (BAFB) volunteers will be participating in the Bayfield Community Fair parade on the morning of Aug. 19.

“We would like to ask the community to help us fill a red, 1955 Ford pick-up truck with goodness by donating dried and canned goods,” said Claire Trepanier, president of the BAFB.

BAFB would like to thank the truck owners Brad and Pam Nolan-Buettenmiller for providing the truck for the parade. People should be on the lookout for the truck sporting the special “Fill this Truck with Goodness” placard as it makes its way along the parade route.

When considering what to donate along the route people should consider that the BAFB pantry is currently in need of soup, crackers, peanut butter and jam.

The BAFB phone number is 519 525-8286. People can also contact the food bank via email at bayfieldareafoodbank@gmail.com.

Collection boxes for donations can be found at the Bayfield Branch Library on Main Street as well as Trinity St. James Anglican Church (outside the entrance to the Parish Hall off the parking lot). There is also a special grocery cart at Bayfield Foodland to welcome donations.

For anyone who would like to support BAFB with a monetary gift, there are a few options available. Cheques can be mailed to: Bayfield Area Food Bank, 10 Keith Cres., Bayfield, ON, N0M 1G0. An e-transfer can be made through BAFB’s gmail account listed above or a donation can be received on-line through the www.canadahelps.org website.

Trinity St James Anglican Church is located at 10 Keith Cres. in the village.

SECONDARY PLAN OPEN HOUSE UPCOMING

The Bayfield Secondary Plan was approved by Bluewater Council in February of this year and included several ‘Implementation Actions’. Two of these actions are underway with proposed amendments to the Bluewater Official Plan and Zoning Bylaw to formally integrate the policy direction of the Secondary Plan.

The Plan included specific policy recommendations for various sections of the Official Plan including Urban Settlement Area, Natural Environment, Heritage and Community Design. A series of changes to the Zoning Bylaw are recommended to provide more specific direction for land uses and lot development requirements in Bayfield. The entire amendment is available on the Municipal website.

The implementing amendments will set out the policy framework for future residential and commercial development with the understanding that the majority of development will not proceed until capacity is available within the Bayfield Wastewater Treatment Plant. Further, the amendment will achieve compliance with recent Provincial legislation (e.g. Bills 23 and 97) and will consider the draft Provincial Planning Statement (2023).

A small number of property-specific zone changes have been included in the amendment; these changes are minor, address errors or facilitate improved development options.

Staff completed public consultation as part of the Secondary Plan development including an Open House (50 attendees) and Public Meeting (100 attendees) in November of 2023. Feedback from both sessions was incorporated into the draft document prior to Council approval.

Additional public consultation is required as per the Planning Act process and will include much of the same information.

This next Open House will be held at the Bayfield Branch Library on Friday, Aug. 25 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The formal Public Meeting will be held at a regular Council meeting on Monday, Oct. 2nd at 6:30 p.m.

Have a question? Get in touch with Denise Van Amersfoort, manager of Planning and Staff Lead for the Bayfield Secondary Plan at planning@huroncounty.ca or call 1-888-524-8394 Ext. 3.

Bayfield_Schedule_11x17_H_Zoning_Draft Bayfield_Schedule_11x17_D_Landuse_Draft

LIBRARY FRIENDS

The Red Table Book Sale offers a good variety of adult fiction and non-fiction books as well as children’s books. Payment is by donation. (Photo by Janet Vogelsang)

The Friends of Bayfield Library (FOBL) Red Table Book Sale is now underway at the Bayfield Branch Library. Visitors to the library will find the Red Table inside the library just in front of the window. Book sale times are during normal library hours from now to Aug. 31.

Unlike the two-day book sales held in previous years, this one will be running continuously until the end of August. That means two whole months of book browsing and lots of great reading!

The Red Table will be regularly stocked with books while supplies last. Payment is by donation. All funds raised through the Book Sale will help to support the Bayfield Library and community programs such as “Saturdays at the Library” speaker series, “Coffee & Chat” groups, and Gingerbread Decorating as well as other fun events throughout the year. The generous support of the community is so appreciated!

FOBL sincerely thanks everyone who answered the call for book donations to make this special book sale possible.

ANGLICAN CHURCH

The upcoming Summer services at Trinity St. James Anglican Church will continue with guests presiding on Sundays as their minister takes some holiday time.

The upcoming Sundays at 11 a.m. services are as follows: ​​Aug. 27 and Sept. 3, Morning Prayer with Lisa Currah.

On Aug. 20, starting at 10:30 a.m., the congregation is encouraged to attend the Interdenominational Service being held at Agricultural Park as part of the Bayfield Community Fair.

Rev. Mary Farmer will return for the Holy Eucharist service on Sept. 10.

Please note there will be no Wednesday services from now to Sept. 7. Wednesday services will resume on Sept. 13.

Trinity St. James Anglican church is located at 10 Keith Crescent in Bayfield.

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

Knox Presbyterian Church in Bayfield will celebrate their 166th anniversary on Sunday,  Aug. 20. The Rev Dr. Stephen Farris, guest preacher, will join Rev Lisa Dolson with harpist Martha Lawrance.

Members of the congregation are currently gathering items for re-use and upcycling. Upcycling takes something no longer in use and gives it a second life with new functions. For example the outer milk bag can be upcycled into sleeping mats. The mats are distributed to people in need throughout the world. Knox Bayfield gathers used stamps, empty egg cartons, outer milk bags and eyeglasses. People can contribute by bringing their items to the church between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Sundays and Mondays (excluding holidays).

People are also invited to join in a book discussion. Participants meet on the lower level of the church at noon on Mondays (excluding holidays). The reading is a launching point for discussions about life and faith. The current focus is “Shalom Sistas – Living Wholeheartedly in a Brokenhearted World” by Osheta Moore. For those who wish to take part, the book can be purchased: here. 

All are welcome to worship services on Sundays at 11 a.m.  Prayer requests can be shared in several ways. Please contact the minister by emailing revlisa.knoxbayfield@icloud.com for more information.

GATEWAY RENEWS PARTNERSHIP WITH WATERLOO SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

Present at the signing event were from l-r: Nancy Simpson, Mary Stanley, Feng Chang, Dan Stringer, Dr. Andrea Edginton, Jay McFarlan and Dr. Nancy Waite. (Submitted photo)

Present at the signing event were from l-r: Nancy Simpson, Mary Stanley, Feng Chang, Dan Stringer, Dr. Andrea Edginton, Jay McFarlan and Dr. Nancy Waite. (Submitted photo)

On Tuesday, May 16, a delegation of Gateway Centre of Excellence in Rural Health (Gateway) board members traveled to Kitchener to sign a new Memorandum of Understanding with the School of Pharmacy at the University of Waterloo.

After a review of the history and recent activities of the two organizations, a look at future collaborations and synergies led to a decision to explore specifics and methodology of advancing rural health together.

The past ten years of the partnership between Gateway and the School of Pharmacy has led to many projects, grants and research covering a wide array of health topics.

Investigating the Opioid Crisis in rural Southwestern Ontario and considering the roles and responsibilities of rural community pharmacists in methadone treatment are just two of the impactful areas of collaborative research.

It is their hope that they can continue these activities that address relevant health concerns for all rural communities.

Gateway president Gwen Devereaux said, “Over the years this relationship has been extremely productive, with many bright minds from the University of Waterloo School of Pharmacy assisting Gateway CERH on projects that promote health in our rural communities.”

Dr. Andrea Edginton commented, “We are looking forward to continuing and strengthening our relationship with Gateway CERH. Supporting health initiatives together will help strengthen our rural communities and positively impact our future health-care system.”

Those attending from Gateway included: Dan Stringer, board chair; Nancy Simpson, board secretary; and Jay McFarlan, rural research chair and board member.

In attendance from the School of Pharmacy were: Hallman Director, Dr. Andrea Edginton; Professor and Associate Director, Dr. Nancy Waite; Associate Professor, Dr. Feng Chang, who is also a board member and rural research chair at Gateway; Associate Professor, Dr. Michael Beazely; and Associate Director, Advancement, Mary Stanley.

PUBLIC INPUT REQUESTED FOR NEW WATERSHED STRATEGY

Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority (ABCA) is preparing for the future of local conservation by creating a new watershed strategy. The local conservation organization is looking to the public to provide input into this plan to guide local watershed management beyond 2023.

The new strategy builds upon the work of the community to develop the Conservation Strategy (in 2011) and the work of staff to develop the previous Watershed Management Strategy in 2015.

A new Watershed-Based Resource Management Strategy (WBRMS) will fulfil requirements of the “Conservation Authorities Act” (CA Act). It will also meet local needs to protect life and property from natural hazards and to manage and protect resources on a watershed basis.

Kate Monk is ABCA Projects Coordinator. She describes the new strategy as an “overarching document” that guides all of the conservation authority’s work with the watershed community.

“This Strategy goes beyond a traditional watershed planning document,” she said. “It is also a business plan for ABCA that includes financial information. It identifies opportunities to engage landowners in the work needed to address issues facing our watershed communities. It also identifies opportunities to collaborate with other organizations.”

The Strategy will:

  • Evaluate programs and recommend future programs and services to address watershed issues facing local communities.
  • Identify infrastructure needs such as stream gauges, flood forecasting and warning communications, water and erosion control projects, and major maintenance of existing projects.
  • Identify future studies and knowledge needs such as subwatershed studies, inventories, research, and stormwater management plans.
  • Include a business plan for delivering programs and services.
  • Integrate climate change adaptation and resiliency into watershed management.
  • Incorporate previous reports and studies.
  • Meet the requirements of the CA Act.

The purpose of the CA Act is “…to provide for the organization and delivery of programs and services that further the conservation, restoration, development and management of natural resources in watersheds in Ontario.”

The ABCA Board of Directors has approved release of the first part of the WBRMS document for public review. Interested people can review the first phase of the Strategy and provide feedback through a survey which includes spaces for written comments. The feedback period for the first phase of the document continues until Sept. 15 at 1 p.m. This first phase of consultation includes the mission and vision statements, strategic priorities, guiding principles for decision-making, and objectives. The Strategy includes characterization of the watershed, setting priorities and objectives, evaluating progress made through the previous strategies, identifying gaps, and creating action plans.

To learn more about the WBRMS, people can visit the: Public Consultation Page on the ABCA website. If they have questions, they can contact staff by telephone at 519 235-2610 or toll-free 1-888-286-2610.

ABCA is an independent, corporate body in Southwestern Ontario on the southeast shores of Lake Huron. It is one of Ontario’s 36 conservation authorities with the mandate to ensure the conservation, restoration and responsible management of Ontario’s water, land and natural habitats through programs that balance human, environmental and economic needs.

ABCA is governed by the CA ACT and has 12 member municipalities: Adelaide Metcalfe, Bluewater, Central Huron, Huron East, Lambton Shores, Lucan Biddulph, Middlesex Centre, North Middlesex, Perth South, South Huron, West Perth, and Warwick. It has a Board of Directors of nine representatives selected by the municipalities.

The 2,440-square-kilometre area of jurisdiction is largely rural with a population of 45,000 and includes the drainage basins of the Ausable River, Bayfield River, Parkhill Creek, Mud Creek and the gullies between Tower Line in Central Huron and Grand Bend draining directly to Lake Huron.

This conservation authority proudly carries the banner of being the first conservation authority formed in Ontario.

Municipalities in the Ausable River watershed formed the former Ausable River Conservation Authority (ARCA) in 1946 to deal with serious problems of local flooding, soil erosion, habitat loss, water supply, and water quality. The jurisdiction was enlarged to include the Bayfield River drainage basin and Lake Huron shoreline watersheds in 1972 and the organization’s name was changed to Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority.

TURTLE RELEASE TEACHES PUBLIC HOW TO PROTECT SPECIES AT RISK

Thursday, Aug. 31, is the date set for the Annual Hatchling Turtle Release now in its eighth year. (Submitted photo)

On Thursday, Aug. 31, the Huron Stewardship Council (HSC), in partnership with Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority (ABCA), is bringing back the Annual Hatchling Turtle Release for the eighth year.

This event, to release turtle hatchlings back into the wild and to show the public how to protect Ontario’s at-risk freshwater turtle species, will take place at Morrison Dam Conservation Area, 71108 Morrison Line, 2 km east of Exeter, from 1-4 p.m.

The turtle release will take place rain or shine. Admission is free but the organizers encourage donations. The afternoon will include live reptiles, family-friendly activities, educational displays, a bake sale and merchandise for sale. Proceeds from the turtle event support Ontario turtle conservation.

Sheldon Paul is a HSC Fieldwork Coordinator. He said the turtle event draws crowds every year and is a great way to educate people of all ages about the need to protect Ontario’s eight turtle species.

“It’s fun, it’s free and we look forward to seeing everyone there,” he said.

Hope Brock is ABCA Healthy Watersheds Technician. She said turtles help to control aquatic vegetation and to clean creeks and wetlands by eating algae and dead and decaying fish and other organisms. People can protect turtles, she said, by watching for turtles on roads when driving, helping them safely cross roads in the way they are headed, protecting nests from predators, and reporting turtle sightings to community monitoring projects. Enhancing turtle habitat is also vital.

“Preserving and creating habitat for turtles and other species is one of the most important things we can do to sustain our turtle species,” she said. “Planting native trees and shrubs, restoring and enhancing wetlands, and growing natural areas all help to protect turtles locally and across Ontario.”

The turtle hatchling release event has taken place since 2016 (it was held as a virtual event in 2020 and 2021).

People attending will not be able to hold the turtles. This is to protect the animals and reduce their stress. Those attending will be able to see the turtles as they are released. The HSC staff releasing the hatchlings are trained and authorized to release them. (Organizers would like to remind the public to never release species, especially non-native species, into the wild.)

Ontario’s native freshwater turtles face many threats including habitat loss and road mortality (death by cars and other vehicles). Hundreds of turtles in Ontario are hit by cars each year in the spring, summer and autumn. These could be gravid (pregnant) females looking for a place to lay eggs, or males and females looking for new ponds and mates. People can help turtles by creating nesting habitat on their properties, stopping to help turtles cross the road in the direction they are heading (when it is safe to do so), and working with their local municipalities and communities to erect turtle crossing signs and build safe passages. People can also arrange for transport of injured turtles to the turtle hospital. People can also act to protect, create, and enhance the natural areas that provide the habitat for turtle hatchlings to eat, drink, reproduce, and grow and become the adult turtles of tomorrow.

To learn more visit: Huron Stewardship Council  and the ABCA’s Turtles Page or email the HSC at huronstewardship@gmail.com.

HURON HOSPICE BUTTERFLY RELEASE AND TELETHON CONCERT RETURN

Huron Hospice is pleased to announce the return of two of their most popular events as they were meant to be experienced. The Seventh Annual Butterfly Release will be back at Bender House and the “No Place Like Home” Telethon will be live.

The Telethon Concert is set for Saturday, Sept. 23 starting at 6:30 p.m. This year the Telethon Concert will be broadcast live from the Kingsbridge Centre. Set to perform are headliners:Amanda McClure and Tom Burke, from Seaforth; Josh Geddis, Steve Dawe and Jess Langan, from Bayfield and Clinton, and Clinton’s own Grant McMillan.

Artistic Director of the Blyth Festival, Gil Garratt and Member of Parliament, Ben Lobb, will join Huron County Coordinator of Tourism and Local Food, Alecia Anderson as celebrity emcees.

“We are pleased to have the three of them join us again. Each brings a deep understanding of Huron County and the arts scene. The fact that Alecia, Ben and Gil are making time for Huron Hospice shows how important the Hospice is for everyone across the County.” said Christopher Walker, Huron Hospice manager of Fund Development.

Walker also thanked the creative team at Faux Pop Studios in Goderich for their dedication to the event.

“Faux Pop helps us put together a wonderful show. It will be an entertaining evening,” he said.

For those who wish to attend the concert live and in-person, tickets are selling for $50 each. This ticket price includes a complimentary Concert Shuttle. Guests must reserve their shuttle seats when they buy their tickets on a first-come, first-serve basis. The event will have cash bar service and beef-on-a-bun. A vegetarian option and cookies will also be available. Goodwill donations will cover food costs.

The annual butterfly release is scheduled for Sunday, Aug. 27, at 2 p.m., in the Huron Hospice Bender House garden.

“Butterflies are an important symbol of transformation for families at Huron Hospice. People gather and release butterflies each year as they remember loved ones who are no longer with them. Children marvel at the butterflies they release to begin their migration south,” said Walker.

He announced some changes to the event this year, “we always release ethically raised butterflies. We know that our pollinating friends, the butterflies and the bees, need us now more than ever. They are losing their habitat and their feeding grounds. Just as you have done in the past, you can purchase a butterfly for the commemorative release or you can do more for these remarkable butterflies. You can also buy a Butterfly Bush or a Black-eyed Susan for your garden.”

Please note these plants will be made available for planting next Spring.

Butterflies are $40 again this year. Butterfly bushes cost $35, and Black-eyed Susans are $20 and can be ordered at Butterfly Release.

Anyone who would prefer to order butterflies in-person are asked to email jilliansimmons@huronhospice.ca or Ben.Matlovich@huronhospice.ca for more information.

In case of rain, the release will be held on Monday, Aug. 28.

Huron Hospice Bender House is located at 37857 Huron Road in Clinton.

BREAKFAST IN THE PARK

After breakfast people are invited to spend some time walking through the historical replica model of St. Joseph. (Submitted photo)

After breakfast people are invited to spend some time walking through the historical replica model of St. Joseph. (Submitted photo)

The St. Joseph and Area Historical Society will be hosting, “Breakfast in the Park” on Saturday, Aug. 19.

This community breakfast will be served in St. Joseph Memorial Park from 8-11 a.m. and will feature fresh local foods including: pancakes, sausages, scrambled eggs, coffee and juice all for a free will donation.

Proceeds from the event will support ongoing maintenance and improvements to the park.

After breakfast people are invited to spend some time walking through the historical replica model of St. Joseph.

St. Joseph Memorial Park is located at the corner of Bluewater Highway and Zurich-Hensall Road (#84).

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY

The beautiful sounds of live harp music playing will be a featured part of this year’s Clinton Horticultural Society’s Annual Flower Show!

The date for the show has been sent for Friday, Aug. 18 from 2-5 p.m. with the added bonus of a Toonie Cafe offered from 2-4 p.m.

The Show will be held at the Clinton Legion located at 95 Kirk Street. All are welcome to attend.

HURON HOSPICE

Huron Hospice’s “No Place Like Home” Telethon Concert is set for Saturday, Sept. 23.

This year the Telethon Concert will be broadcast live from the Kingsbridge Centre starting at 6:30 p.m. Set to perform are headliners:Amanda McClure and Tom Burke, from Seaforth; Josh Geddis, Steve Dawe and Jess Langan, from Bayfield and Clinton, and Clinton’s own Grant McMillan.

Artistic Director of the Blyth Festival, Gil Garratt and Member of Parliament, Ben Lobb, will join Huron County Coordinator of Tourism and Local Food, Alecia Anderson as celebrity emcees.

“We are pleased to have the three of them join us again. Each brings a deep understanding of Huron County and the arts scene. The fact that Alecia, Ben and Gil are making time for Huron Hospice shows how important the Hospice is for everyone across the County.” said Christopher Walker, Huron Hospice manager of Fund Development.

Walker also thanked the creative team at Faux Pop Studios in Goderich for their dedication to the event.

“Faux Pop helps us put together a wonderful show. It will be an entertaining evening,” he said.

For those who wish to attend the concert live and in-person, tickets are selling for $50 each. This ticket price includes a complimentary Concert Shuttle. Guests must reserve their shuttle seats when they buy their tickets on a first-come, first-serve basis. The event will have cash bar service and beef-on-a-bun. A vegetarian option and cookies will also be available. Goodwill donations will cover food costs.

HURON SHORES AREA TRANSIT

Headliner Ad Card advertising is considered one of the most cost-effective marketing methods and is now being offered by Huron Shores Area Transit. (Submitted photo)

Huron Shores Area Transit logo

As part of Huron Shores Area Transit’s (HSAT) ongoing development and goal of long-term sustainability, it has introduced an Advertising Program to generate supplementary revenue. This initiative will help the transit agency transition to Ontario’s Gas Tax Fund in 2025, ensuring the continued provision of public transit in the region.

The Advertising Program’s first phase offers Headliner Ad Card advertising opportunities. This type of advertising displays above the bus windows, ensuring maximum visibility for all passengers. Future expansion of the program will include transit shelter, bench, and bike rack advertising options. This means even more opportunities for local businesses and organizations to showcase their products and services to local residents and area visitors while supporting public transit.

Headliner Ad Card advertising is considered one of the most cost-effective marketing methods because passengers on public transit can be a captive audience for an extended period, potentially up to an hour and 50 minutes, providing businesses with ample exposure time.

The number of headliner ad spots is limited to 18, nine on each of HSAT’s two buses and Transit Coordinator Susan Mills reports three of those 18 spots are already sold for late summer and early fall.

Mills said, “Any business curious about trying this advertising method should not wait but call and book their spot.”

Pricing is reasonable, with winter months priced at $12.50 per week, spring and fall priced at $18.75 per week, and peak summer months priced at $25 per week.

HSAT’s Advertising Program is part of the agency’s strategy to achieve financial sustainability while providing a valuable platform for businesses to reach a captive audience. Under the Ontario Gas Tax Funding formula, the more revenue HSAT generates through advertising, fares, and donations, the less financial contribution is needed by local municipalities. The current municipal contribution is estimated at $3.52 per person per year (for comparison, Crossing Guards cost $3.21 per capita, and Harbours cost $11.75 per capita). That amount can be lowered by increasing HSAT’s net revenue. The Advertising Program is a win-win solution that benefits the transit agency, businesses looking to promote their products or services, municipal budgets, and local residents.

For more information about the Advertising Program, visit HuronShoresAreaTransit.ca/advertise.

SOUTH HURON CLINIC

The South Huron Walk-in Clinic is now offering hours on Saturdays, Sundays and statutory holidays (except for Christmas Day).

Appointments are offered from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Registration opens at 10:45 a.m. and closes at 1:45 p.m. or earlier if capacity is reached.

To book an appointment please call 519 235-3343.

The South Huron Walk-in Clinic is located at 23 Huron Street West in Exeter.

FENG SHUI WORKSHOP

This fall, individuals have the opportunity to join a fun and interactive two-day Feng Shui workshop in Bayfield.

At the workshop participants will learn simple and common-sense methods to assess the energy of indoor and outdoor space and how to make changes through placement, color and texture of certain objects. The workshop has been designed for beginners who have little or no knowledge of Feng Shui, just the desire to learn something new.

The workshop will be held on Thursday, Sept. 21 and Friday, Sept. 22 at the Bayfield Town Hall, 11 The Square, Bayfield. The event will run each day from 9-4:30 p.m.

Helen Varekamp will be facilitating the workshop. Varekamp was an instructor for QC Design College, teaching Feng Shui workshops, and had a consulting business in interior design and Feng Shui design. Now retired, she volunteers for several community organizations, and is dedicating her time and knowledge to this event, with all proceeds going to Huron Hospice.

According to Varekamp, Feng Shui is the study of how your environment affects you and your quality of life, how to become aware of the deep relationship you have with your surroundings, and how to better arrange your environment. Feng Shui is not a belief system or religion – you don’t need to believe in it in order for it to work. It has nothing to do with changing your luck, but it will help you create a space that promotes feelings of happiness and wellbeing.

“Have you ever been in a space that feels uncomfortable, but don’t know why, let alone how to change it? This is where Feng Shui can help, often by implementing simple and inexpensive changes,” said Varekamp.

Feng Shui can be implemented in any home, regardless of size or ownership, as well as outdoor spaces, and places of business such as retail, office, or classrooms. Learning and implementing the principles of Feng Shui can help you create a house or garden that welcomes you home. Simply put – when you live and work in a place that feels good, your attitude will likely become more positive, improving your quality of life.

Varekamp explained, “Feng Shui observes the relationship between the seen and unseen forces of nature. You too can learn how to blend harmoniously with a friendly, comfortable and positive environment! There is no need to be a designer, Feng Shui can be practiced by anyone. Once you have learned some basic principles, it can be life altering how quickly and easily you will be able to assess any space.”

A lovely lunch as well as snacks and beverages will be served on both days. Participants will receive a binder with course information, a Feng Shui book, and a certificate of achievement.

The early bird registration fee is $675 which is HST exempt; after Sept. 1 the fee will be $750. Participants will receive a $500 charitable tax receipt from Huron Hospice. Early registration is recommended, as limited seating is available! This is a scent-free event.

For more information and registration, visit the Event page of the Huron Hospice website at Feng Shui Workshop.

“Once again, appreciation is extended to the students of the leadership class and Ms. McLeod for their efforts,” concluded Lavoie.

GODERICH LIONS

Goderich Lions Club members understand that people are missing the social aspect of in-person Bingos and their volunteers have been exploring ways to bring this style of fundraiser back to the community and surrounding area.

The Park House in Goderich and the Huron Fish and Game Club in Clinton are now the settings for Goderich Lions Club Bingo on Monday and Wednesday evenings starting at 7 p.m. Please note that Bingo tickets will not be available at these new sites.  People can get their tickets at the locations listed below. For more information visit Goderich Lions on Facebook.

For those who prefer to play from the comfort of their own home Goderich Lions TV Bingo will continue also on Monday and Wednesday evenings starting at 7 p.m. They are broadcast on Eastlink Channel 10, Hurontel Channel 1 and Tuckersmith Channel 1.

Tickets for the televised games are available at Bayfield Convenience and Gifts; Clinton Foodland and Clinton Convenience; Buckey Joes, Vanastra; Hodgins Home Hardware, Lucknow; Goderich Convenience; Suncoast Variety, Goderich; and Finchers in Goderich and Kincardine. Lottery License #: M717413.

BAYFIELD ACTIVITIES

Looking for what is happening now in the village? Look no further than the Bayfield Activities Calendar . People are invited to refer to this website to learn what activities, from Pickleball to Mahjong, are happening and when.

Remember This

The Huron County Museum is home to thousands of artifacts that illustrate the history of both the rural and urban populations of the area. Space dictates what wonderful curiosities the public regularly gets to see when they visit the museum located at 110 North Street in Goderich. But where there is wifi, there is an opportunity to time-travel with over 6,700 pieces of the museum’s collection now available to view online at huroncountymuseum.pastperfectonline.com.

“Remember This” highlights items from the collection of the Huron County Museum and Historic Gaol. Items that have shaped the fabric of the county and the people who have lived here since before the county became the county in 1835 up until more recent times.

In recognition of the Bayfield Community Fair this coming weekend, we take a look at a quilt designed with agricultural themes that can be found in the Museum’s collection…

FARM THEMED QUILT

This is a brown and tan quilt with appliqued designs. The lettering near the top of the quilt says: “OMAF”. Near the top there is a picture of a skyline and there are also farm scenes throughout the rest of the quilt.

This quilt was made by Doris Bushell for the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food (OMAF) Huron County’s Centennial Quilt Contest in 1988. Bushell was awarded first prize and $500 for her efforts.

LOVE YOUR GREATS DAY

LESS COASTAL TRASH A WIN FOR THE LAKE

PHOTOS BY MELODY FALCONER POUNDER

“Love Your Greats Day” was held locally on Saturday, Aug. 12 and following a clean up of the coastline and the sorting of the collected trash people were invited to have some fun at River Road Brewing and Hops located just outside of Bayfield. Organizers considered the event to be an amazing success.

Posted on the River Road Brewery and Hops Facebook page, “We managed to gather buckets and buckets of trash along our coastline, in and under the lake. From what seemed like a million cigarette butts to dirty diapers and tons of plastics with everything in between, it’s amazing what you find and super unfortunate, but at least now there is less to make its way into our amazing lake…A huge thank you to Love Your Greats for allowing us to be a part of this enlightening day.”

They also extended a thank you to all of the terrific volunteers that spent the day picking up garbage, sorting garbage and transporting it. The day was also filmed for future “Love Your Greats” promotion.

Volunteers, as well as the public, had the opportunity to enjoy some musical entertainment when the band the “The Woodshed Howlers” took to the Brewery stage offering up their own brand of rock, blues and funk. for entertaining everyone at the Brewery. The folks at the Woodland Drive-In from Bayfield were on site with their food truck to keep everyone sated and the desire to shop was covered as well – with vendors offering lovely locally made products from woodcraft to unique knitted plant hangers.

The Love Your Greats Day organizers are indebted to the following businesses and organizations for making the day possible: Yoga Den, Goderich; Bayfield Marine Store, Bayfield River Valley Trails Association, Shop Bike Coffee, Bayfield; and the Lake Huron Coastal Centre, Goderich.

LITTLE WAYS TO LOVE YOUR GREATS EVERYDAY

“Love Your Greats Day” organizers say local citizens and local communities can take positive actions to protect Lake Huron and the other Great Lakes.

There are many ways people can help to protect and enhance Lake Huron on a daily basis. Some are as simple as taking litterless lunches to the beach, using reusable water bottles and refilling them at local water refill stations, properly disposing of waste, and continuing to help clean up litter along Lake Huron.

When thinking longer term, people may plant trees or donate to local tree planting programs. They may use rain barrels or add rain gardens or wetlands or make other stormwater management improvements.

Organizers encourage people to think of actions they can take, as an individual, to protect and improve the Great Lakes. They invite individuals to choose products that don’t pollute; to reduce plastic use; and to do projects that slow down or capture water running off of a property.

Consider adding green infrastructure to a property. Green infrastructure includes forests and woodlots, wetlands and stormwater ponds, soil, and natural areas. It also includes technologies to absorb water and manage runoff. These technologies include rain barrels and permeable pavement. These green technologies filter and store stormwater and replicate ecosystem functions.

Enhancing natural features and green infrastructure has many benefits for Lake Huron communities. It can help to store, filter, and treat water running over land during storm events. Adding natural features to the landscape has benefits for air and water quality. It provides habitat for wildlife and pollinators. It makes communities more resilient and better prepared to adapt during extreme weather as the climate continues to change. Green infrastructure can reduce flood risk by slowing and reducing stormwater. This is an economic benefit as well.

Green infrastructure benefits creeks, rivers, and Lake Huron. This natural infrastructure can also help with adaptation to extreme weather and changing climates. To learn more people are invited to watch this video: Valuing Green Infrastructure. People can contact their local conservation authority to find out about technical expertise and grant incentives that may be available to help.

PIXILATED

 IMAGE OF THE WEEK

967DFCD9-BCFD-4E88-A4DE-4A2B4C86132C

Sunflowers…By Jenny Shanahan

Submit Your photo

Email your photo in Jpeg format to hello@bayfield-breeze.com with the subject line Subscriber Photo of the Week. or…Upload your photo to Flickr.

I am looking for the Bayfield that is a delight to the eye – please share photos with a touch of whimsy, beauty, humor or a sense of fun. If you are to include people in your photos be sure to have their permission to publish their picture on-line and also send in their names and where they are from. And don’t forget to tell me who took the photo for proper credit to be issued.

SUBMISSIONS

Image of Melody Falconer-Pounder

51854912498_7d52e952ba_k

Melody Falconer-Pounder

Bayfield Breeze has for a few years now had a Facebook page from which people could view, share and comment on our weekly issues. This week Meta began following through with their threat to remove access to the sharing of Canadian news content on their platforms – Facebook and Instagram – in response to the Online News Act (Bill C-18) that was passed by our Federal government in June.

This impacts not only the big media outlets. It will definitely hurt small, independent news sources dedicated to serving their local communities. The ones  that would not receive any financial remuneration even if  Bill C-18 were to succeed.  At this present time, our 1,600 Facebook followers can still view our issues but they will be blocked if they try to share them on their news feed.

Meta’s power is only limited to their platforms and they can’t block people from visiting our website directly and/or subscribing to the Bayfield Breeze for free and having the issues delivered to their inbox every Wednesday morning. I invite those reading this via Facebook this morning to subscribe today. It’s pretty darn easy with links to do so at the top and bottom of this issue. And please invite your friends to subscribe as well perhaps through alternative methods outside the meta-box. – Melody

Ideas and contributions to the Bayfield Breeze are always welcome.
Deadlines for submissions are Sundays at 4 p.m.